THE INTERNATIONAL BILL OF HUMAN RIGHTS
P

UNOOSA

United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs

Secretary - General Mr. Ban Ki-moon | President of the General Assembly Mr. Vuk Jeremic | Member States 1945 : 51 | 2011 : 193 Member States

   

 

Functions and Powers of The Security Council

UDHR MN

HRD

MN1

MN2

MN5

 

 

 

 

 

United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs ( UNOOSA )

The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs was initially created as a small expert unit within the Secretariat to service the ad hoc Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space established by the General Assembly in its resolution 1348 (XIII) of 13 December 1958. It became a unit within the Department of Political and Security Council Affairs in 1962, when the permanent Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space met for the first time, and was transformed into the Outer Space Affairs Division of that Department in 1968. In 1992, the Division was transformed into the Office for Outer Space Affairs within the Department for Political Affairs. In 1993, the Office was relocated to the United Nations Office at Vienna. At that time, the Office also assumed responsibility for substantive secretariat services to the Legal Subcommittee, which had previously been provided by the Office of Legal Affairs in New York. Questions relating to the militarization of outer space are dealt by the Conference on Disarmament, based in Geneva.

The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs implements the decisions of the General Assembly and of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. The office has the dual objective of supporting the intergovernmental discussions in the Committee and its Scientific and Technical Subcommittee (S&T) and Legal Subcommittee, and of assisting developing countries in using space technology for development. In addition, it follows legal, scientific and technical developments relating to space activities, technology and applications in order to provide technical information and advice to Member States, international organizations and other United Nations offices.

The Office is headed by a Director and has two sections: the Space Applications Section, which organizes and carries out the United Nations Programme on Space Applications, and the Committee Services and Research Section, which provides substantive secretariat services to the Committee, its two subcommittees and its working groups. The Committee Services and Research Section also prepares and distributes reports and publications on international space activities and on international space law.

Ms. Simonetta Di Pippo of Italy serves as Director of the Office since March 2014.

Simonetta Di Pippo (born Rome, 1959) is an Italian astrophysicist. From May 2008 to March 2011 she was Director, Human Spaceflight at European Space Agency. From May 2012, she has been appointed the Head of the European Space Policy Observatory at ASI Brussels. From June 2009 she's President and co-founder of the international association Women in Aerospace Europe, based in the Netherlands. Knighted by the President of the Italian Republic in 2006, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) named asteroid 21887 "dipippo" as a recognition of her contribution to space exploration. In May 2013, the St. John's University in Vinovo (TO) awarded her with an Honoris Causa Degree in Environmental Studies.

Simonetta Di Pippo, Master degree in Astrophysics and Space Physics at the Univ. “La Sapienza” in Rome, Italy in 1984, joined the Italian Space Agency (ASI) in 1986. Ranging responsibilities from Earth Observation to Automation&Robotics, Science and Human Spaceflight, she took up duty as Director of the Observation of the Universe in 2002. Director of Human Spaceflight at the European Space Agency (ESA) from 2008 to 2011, she is currently the Head of the European Space Policy Observatory at ASI – Brussels. Starting from June 2009, she is President and co-founder of the international association Women in Aerospace Europe (WIA-E), with legal base in the Netherlands and with the main aim of expanding the women representation and leadership in the aerospace sector. Currently, she is also the Chair of the Study “Public/Private Human access to space”, on behalf of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) dealing with commercial human spaceflight of the future. Knighted by the President of the Italian Republic in 2006, the International Astronomical Union in 2008 assigned the name “dipippo” to asteroid 21887, in recognition of her effort in space exploration. Author of more than 60 publications, more than 700 articles and interviews on magazines and newspapers, members and President of scientific committees of international congresses, member and President of scientific awards’ jury, she has been teaching at various Universities, including the George Washington University in Washington D.C. and the LUISS-Business School in Rome. She is the author of a blog on LaStampa.it devoted to provide information about the use of satellites and space activities to improve the quality of life on Earth, called SpazioGreen [2] and she is also member of the editorial board of the NewSpace Journal. In May 2013 she got from the St. John University an Honoris Causa Degree in Environmental Studies.[3] Since April 2013 she is member of the Global Board Ready Women, the list of potential top managers created by European Business Schools in the framework of the Women on Board initiative.[4] Appointed Academician of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) in July 2013, she is chairing since July 2012 on behalf of the Academy the study "Public/Private Human Access to Space", with the aim of analysing on a global scale the potential market development for commercial human spaceflight.

 

Awards And Honours

 

     
     

 

Niklas Hedman (Mr.), Chief 
Committee Services and Research Section 
Office for Outer Space Affairs 
United Nations Office at Vienna 
Room: E-0947 
PO Box 500 
1400 Vienna 
Austria 

 

 

 

 

Ms. Mazlan Othman of Malaysia serves as Director of the Office since December 2007. Till March 2014

Dr. Mazlan OTHMAN

Mazlan Binti Othman (born December 11, 1951) is a Malaysian astrophysicist who has served in several roles within her country, and as Director of the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs in Vienna.

Born in Seremban, Malaysia, Mazlan attended Tunku Kurshiah College, a boarding school in Seremban, Negeri Sembilan. Her aptitude for mathematics led to enrollment in a science curriculum, and though her family encouraged her to become a physician, she decided to pursue physics instead. She attended University of Otago in New Zealand on a Colombo plan scholarship, earning a BSc. (honors) in 1975. She joined the National University of Malaysia (UKM) as a tutor, but negotiated an extension to her scholarship and returned to Otago, earning her Ph.D. in physics in 1981 - the first woman to do so since the University was founded in 1869.

Dato' Mazlan Othman returned to Malaysia as the country's first astrophysicist, and worked to create a curriculum in astrophysics at the national university, as well as to build public awareness and understanding of astronomy and space issues. She also performed research for a semester at the Kiso Observatory in Japan.

Her interest in public education was rewarded in 1990 when Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad, a strong supporter of education and science, placed her in charge of the Planetarium Division of the Prime Minister's Department, overseeing development of Planetarium Negara, Malaysia's national planetarium in Kuala Lumpur. After the planetarium opened in 1993, Mazlan was made Director General of the government's new Space Science Studies Division, where she launched a microsatellite development program. She received a full professorship the following year.

In November 1999, Kofi AnnanSecretary-General of the United Nations, appointed Mazlan as Director of the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) in Vienna. At the request of Prime Minister Mahathir, she returned to Malaysia in July 2002 to serve for five years as the founding Director General of Angkasa, the Malaysian National Space Agency, where her work led to the launch of the first Malaysian astronaut, Sheikh Muszaphar Shukor.

Mazlan was reappointed as UNOOSA director in 2007 by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, and left Angkasa to return to the post that December. At UNOOSA she deals with issues of international cooperation in space, prevention of collisions and space debris, use of space-based remote sensing platforms for sustainable development, coordination of space law between countries, and the risks posed by near-earth asteroids, among other topics.

In September 2010, several news sources reported the United Nations would soon appoint Mazlan to be the ambassador for extraterrestrial contact, apparently basing their claims on remarks she made suggesting that the UN coordinate any international response to such contact, and her scheduled appearance on a Royal Society panel that October, "Towards a scientific and societal agenda on extra-terrestrial life." However, a UN spokesperson dismissed the reports as "nonsense", dismissing any plan to expand the mandate of UNOOSA, and in an email to The Guardian, Othman stated, in compliance to the wishes of the United Nations, "It sounds really cool but I have to deny it." She later explained that her talk would illustrate how extraterrestrial affairs could become a topic of discussion at the UN, using as an example the advocacy that led to UN discussion of near-Earth objects and space debris.

PROFESSOR Dr. Mazlan OTHMAN
M

Professor Dr. M OTHMAN

Head of UNOOSA

United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs

Image Credits : www.un.org

 

 

Honors

In the 1997 Agong's honours list, Tuanku Ja'afar, tenth Yang di-Pertuan Agong of Malaysia, conferred the federal decoration and order Panglima Jasa Negara (for meritorious service) on Mazlan, granting her the honorific "Datuk."

Also in 1997, Mazlan's alma mater, the University of Otago, awarded her the degree of Honorary Doctor of Science.

In 2009, for "her work in developing astronomy education in Malaysia and her leading national and international role in space science," the Institute of Physics awarded Mazlan its President's Medal.

In 2013 she received the "Polarstern-Preis" (Polarstar Award) from the Austrian Space Forum for her engagement to fascinate for space above and beyond duty. 

UNITED NATIOS Office At Vienna | Location of UNOOSA since 1993
M

Image Credit : Wikipedia.org | License Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Credits : www.un.org | Wikipedia.org


 

 

UNICEF is the driving force that helps build a world where the rights of every child are realized. We have the global authority to influence decision-makers, and the variety of partners at grassroots level to turn the most innovative ideas into reality.  That makes us unique among world organizations, and unique among those working with the young.

UNICEF believes that nurturing and caring for children are the cornerstones of human progress.  UNICEF was created with this purpose in mind – to work with others to overcome the obstacles that poverty, violence, disease and discrimination place in a child’s path.  We believe that we can, together, advance the cause of humanity.

UNICEF advocates for measures to give children the best start in life, because proper care at the youngest age forms the strongest foundation for a person’s future.

UNICEF promotes girls’ education – ensuring that they complete primary education as a minimum – because it benefits all children, both girls and boys. Girls who are educated grow up to become better thinkers, better citizens, and better parents to their own children.

UNICEF is committed to changing the world for children. It strives to protect their rights, improve their health, and nurture their development through sound planning and monitoring of policy results.

Current Executive Director of UNICEF is Mr. Anthony LAKE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR of UNICEF Mr. Anthony LAKE
M

Image Credits : www.unicef.org

 

Mr. Anthony Lake became UNICEF’s sixth Executive Director on 1 May 2010

The STRUCTURE of UNICEF

With its strong presence in 190 countries, UNICEF is the world's leading advocate for children.

The heart of UNICEF's work is in the field. Each country officecarries out UNICEF's mission through a unique programme of cooperation developed with the host government. This five-year programme focuses on practical ways to realize the rights of children and women. Their needs are analyzed in a situation report produced at the beginning of the programme cycle.Regional offices guide this work and provide technical assistance to country offices as needed. UNICEF's work is fully part of other United Nations activities in a country. 

Overall management and administration of the organization takes place at headquarters, where global policy on children is shaped. Specialized offices include the Supply Division, based in Copenhagen, which provides such essential items as the majority of  life-saving vaccine doses for children in developing countries.

UNICEF also operates the Innocenti Research Centre in Florence and Offices for Japan and Brussels, which assist with fund-raising and liaison with policy makers.

Many people in industrialized countries first hear about UNICEF’s work through the activities of 36National Committees for UNICEF. These non-governmental organizations promote children’s rights, raise funds, sell UNICEF greeting cards and products, create key corporate and civil societypartnerships, and provide other invaluable support. The committees raise a third of UNICEF's resources.

Well known National Commitee campaigns include Check Out for Children, where guests add a donation to UNICEF to their room bill when checking out; Change For Good®, which enables passengers on international airlines to donate their leftover foreign coins and notes; and 'Trick or Treat for UNICEF,' in which milions of children in the United States, Canada, Mexico and Ireland raise funds for UNICEF.

UNICEF is supported entirely by voluntary funds. Governments contribute two thirds of our resources; private groups and some 6 million individual donors contribute the rest through our National Committees. 

Guiding and monitoring all of UNICEF's work is a 36-member Executive Board made up of government representatives. They establish policies, approve programmes and decide on administrative and financial plans and budgets. Members are elected by the United Nations Economic and Social Council, usually for three-year terms.

UNICEF Headquarters

Country Web Site: http://www.unicefusa.org

NEW YORK

National Committee

Mail address

 

United States Fund for UNICEF 
125 Maiden Lane, 11th Floor
New York, NY 10038

Visitors' address

 

United States Fund for UNICEF 
125 Maiden Lane, 11th Floor
New York, NY 10038

Telephone

 

Country code

1

City code

212

 

686.5522

Facsimile

 

779.1679

Email

 

got to:http://www.unicefusa.org/about/contact/

 

NEW YORK

Headquarters

Mail address

 

UNICEF House
3 United Nations Plaza
New York, New York 10017
U.S.A.

Visitors' address

 

3 United Nations Plaza
44th Street between 1st and 2nd Avenues
New York, New York

Telephone

 

Country code

1

City code

212

 

326.7000 - Switchboard UNICEF House

Facsimile

 

887.7465 - Primary
887.7454 - Secondary

Email

 

URL http://www.unicef.org

 
UNICEF Child - Friendly School Model

The child-friendly school (CFS) model is simple: it calls for schools to operate in the best interests of the child. Child-friendly educational environments must be safe, healthy and protective. They must be provided with trained teachers, adequate resources and appropriate physical, emotional and social conditions for learning.

Within a child-friendly school, children’s rights are protected and their voices are heard. The learning environment is a haven in which children can learn and grow and in which their identities and varied needs are respected. The CFS model promotes inclusiveness, gender sensitivity, tolerance, dignity and personal empowerment.

There is no single way to make a school child-friendly. Though the model may differ from country to country, in every culture a child-friendly school provides child-centred education in a safe, healthy and holistic environment.

Child-friendly environments build on the assets that children bring from their homes and communities, respecting their unique backgrounds and circumstances. The CFS model compensates for any shortcomings in the home or community that might impede a child’s ability to enrol in school, attend regularly or succeed in studies. For example, when learning is hampered by a lack of food, a school feeding programme can provide children the nutrition they need. In such circumstances it also serves as an incentive to stay in school, reinforcing its child-friendliness.

The CFS model also builds partnerships between schools and communities. Children have the right to be fully prepared to become active and productive citizens, so their learning must be linked to the conditions and needs of their community.  

National governments can encourage the development of child-friendly schools by promoting free enrolment, prohibiting corporal punishment, encouraging the use of local languages in schools, integrating children with disabilities into mainstream schools, allowing pregnant students to complete their education, and implementing the right to education for children living with HIV and/or AIDS. 

To ensure sustainability of the CFS approach, governments can work to infuse key elements of the CFS model into all aspects of the education system, including the processes and parameters that shape the system. This means that planning, implementation, financing, staffing, management, supervision, monitoring and evaluation of education in the country will intrinsically embrace the CFS model.

In the past decade, the CFS approach has become UNICEF’s preferred strategy for promoting quality education, even during emergencies. When emergencies strike, UNICEF provides school-in-a-box kits to temporary child-friendly learning spaces. The routine of going to school helps children recover from trauma while also keeping their education on track. Our success in implementing the CFS model depends on collaboration with international partners. Together, we work to ensure that all children – regardless of whether they attend school in a building, in a tent or under a tree – receive a rights-based, quality education.

UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre Florence Italy

UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre in FlorenceItaly, was established in 1988, to strengthen the research capability of the United Nations Children's Fund and to support its advocacy for children worldwide.

The centre, formally known as the International Child Development Centre, has as its prime objectives to improve international understanding of issues relating to children's rights, to promote economic policies that advance the cause of children, and to help facilitate the full implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in industrialized and developing countries.

The programme for 2006–2008 was approved by UNICEF Executive Board in September 2005. It reaffirms the centre's academic freedom and the focus of IRC's research on knowledge gaps, emerging questions and sensitive issues which are relevant to the realization of children's rights, in developing and industrialized countries. It capitalizes on IRC's role as an interface between UNICEF field experience, international experts, research networks and policy makers and is designed to strengthen the centre's institutional collaboration with regional academic and policy institutions, pursuing the following goals:

Three interrelated strategies will guide the achievement of these goals:

UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre Florence | Italy | Established in 1988
M

Image Creditv: Wikipedia.org | License Creative Commons Attribution - Share Alike

 

 

 

 

 

Credit : www.unicef.org


 

Current President of The ECOSOC is His Excellency Néstor OSORIO .

His Excellency Néstor Osorio was elected sixty-ninth President of the Economic and Social Council on 28 January 2013. Ambassador Osorio is currently the Ambassador

and

Permanent Representative of Colombia to the United Nations in New York.

ECOSOC BUREAU

The Bureau of the Economic and Social Council is elected by the Council at large at the beginning of each annual session. The Bureau's main functions are to propose the agenda, draw up

a programme of work and organize the session with the support of the United Nations Secretariat.

Bureau members for 2013:

President of ECOSOC: H.E. Ambassador Néstor Osorio (Colombia)

Vice-President of ECOSOC: H. E. Ambassador Daffa-Alla Elhag Ali Osman (Sudan)

Vice-President of ECOSOC: H.E. Ambassador Masood Khan (Pakistan)

Vice-President of ECOSOC: H. E. Ambassador Ferit Hoxha (Albania)

Vice-President of ECOSOC: H.E. Ambassador Martin Sajdik (Austria)

United Nations Economic and Social Council | ECOSOC
M

Image Credit : Wikipedia.org | License Creative Commons Attribution - Share Alike 3.0 Unported

 

ECOSOC MEMBERS

The Council's 54 member Governments are elected by the General Assembly for overlapping three-year terms. Seats on the Council are allotted based on geographical representation with fourteen allocated to African States, eleven to Asian States, six to Eastern European States, ten to Latin American and Caribbean States, and thirteen to Western European and other States.

ECOSOC Members | On Right Year Term Expires per 31 December

Albania

2015

Austria

2014

Belarus

2014

Benin

2015

Bolivia (Plurinational State of)

2015

Brazil

2014

Bulgaria

2013

Burkina Faso

2014

Cameroon

2013

Canada

2015

China

2013

Colombia

2015

Croatia

2015

Cuba

2014

Denmark

2013

Dominican Republic

2014

Ecuador

2013

El Salvador

2014

Ethiopia

2014

France

2014

Gabon

2013

Haiti

2015

India

2014

Indonesia

2014

Ireland

2014

Japan

2014

Kuwait

2015

Kyrgyzstan

2015

Latvia

2013

Lesotho

2014

Libya

2014

Malawi

2013

Mauritius

2015

Mexico

2013

Nepal

2015

Netherlands

2015

New Zealand

2013

Nicaragua

2013

Nigeria

2014

Pakistan

2013

Qatar

2013

Republic of Korea

2013

Russian Federation

2013

San Marino

2015

Senegal

2013

South Africa

2015

Spain

2014

Sudan

2015

Sweden

2013

Tunisia

2015

Turkey

2014

Turkmenistan

2015

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

2013

United States of America

2015

 


 

Brief List of SUBSIDIARY BODIES OF ECOSOC

ECOSOC Functional Commissions

ECOSOC Regional Commissions


ECOSOC Standing Committees

QUEEN RANIA AL ABDULLAH of JORDAN
 
 
 

 

Credit : www.un.org | wikipedia.org